[Single Review] – Siore ‘Change Your Mind’

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Review by Vince Leigh

This new release from Melbourne indie electro-pop duo Siore begins with ambient rhythms and jangly guitars, but it’s the emotionally stirring vocal that follows which gives us a better clue as to the direction of the song; a dreamy, introspective piece with some melodic flashpoints and pop crescendos that put it firmly in radio land.

Jessica Evans’ delicately calibrated voice carries the wistful first verse with just the right amount of purring solemnity until it gives way to a multi-layered second verse which climbs effortlessly towards some very pleasant, impelling notes.

The song lifts to a chorus which has all the anchoring points in place: the repetition, the double-edged nature of the lyric and the supporting armoury of synth-like guitars arp and swirling textures. Although the arrangement might be considered formulaic, it does ebb and flow, with the subsequent bridge breakdown featuring Jessica’s voice, accompanied only by dark pulsating rhythms chords and swelling textures, going to a register that imposes a streak of forlornness nowhere else in the song.

The production is lush, with gleaming highs and lows throughout the song, the use of essentials such as lavish reverbs and cinematic musical nuances artfully harnessed. The duo’s style is reminiscent of Ms Mr, London Grammar and Broods with some of the elegant grandeur of Florence and the Machine in there also.

The vivid nature of the production is the ideal bedding for Jessica’s voice, which despite blasting off in the choruses, reveals a more fragile, ethereal side when it floats up to the higher notes, such as in the end chant refrains, lulling us into a steady, immersed state.

This song has some powerful moments with a lyric that is heart-searching and reflective. It will be interesting to hear Siore’s EP when it’s released later in the year, and whether the duo can fulfil the promise of this track, their second offering. The music video for Change Your Mind (available below) aptly reflects all the nuances and haunting inferences of the record and is worth checking out also.

 

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